Posts by: Danny Ozment

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This week’s episode features Jeanette Bronée, performance strategist, culture coach, wellness advocate, and founder of Path For Life, Inc.  Jeanette helps leaders and companies rethink performance by asking “The Right Why®” so they can lead themselves and their people better and achieve sustainable success. She is passionate about how we can create a culture of care by unlocking what truly drives performance, engagement, and motivation from the inside out.

In this episode, we talk about the intersection of wellness, well-being, culture, leadership, and performance. In addition, Jeanette shares a poignant story about her mother. She also sweetly talks about her father who was also an executive headhunter.

If mental illness has touched your life, or you simply want to know how to take better care of yourself, and also want to know what well-being has to do with leadership and performance, I promise you don’t want to miss this episode. Sit back and listen to a special and very human episode of Let’s Fix Work.

In this episode, you’ll hear:

  1. Jeannette’s idea of changing the nature of work and the importance of self-care
  2. Her unique approach to fixing work
  3. Applying the methodology of thinking as your employee’s clients when a conflict arises, how it can help clear the fog and makes relationships a little bit different
  4. What is making us sick at work and how we can overcome it
  5. The connection between nutrition and work and what Jeannette is doing to advocate for better nutrition
  6. Advocacy of mindfulness, what it is, and the applicability for the workforce
  7. Jeannette’s thoughts on creating a company culture of pausing, and what could change
  8. The role of leadership in fixing work, creating a less toxic and more engaging culture, climate, and work environment

Resources from this episode:

Thank you to our sponsor: Ultimatesoftware.com/LFW

Website: www.jeanettebronee.com

For videos:www.jeanettebronee.com/keynote-speaker/

Blog: pathforlife.com

Twitter: twitter.com/jeanettebronee

LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/jeanettebronee

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We’re proud to be sponsored by Ultimate Software. They’re a leading cloud provider of people management solutions with a commitment to continuing education for HR, talent, and payroll professionals.

Ultimate Software is hosting dozens of free educational HR workshops around the country. Check out ultimatesoftware.com/LFW for more information on how to earn free HRCI, SHRM, and APA recertification credits.

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It’s important to celebrate milestones. I recently aired my 50th episode of Let’s Fix Work.

It’s hard to believe almost a year has passed since I launched this little podcast. Over the past eleven months, I’ve met some inspiring thinkers and tackled topics from asshole bosses to sexual harassment to universal basic income.⠀

One thing I know more than ever: We fix work by deprioritizing corporate interests and focusing on our whole lives. If we do the inner work needed to be healthy adults with good relationships, our efforts carry over to our jobs.⠀

Let’s face it, even when we love our jobs and we feel secure, we are still a little worried about our future. That’s being human.

But what is the difference between being a successful human versus being a complacent human? Well, I’ll tell ya.

Successful humans don’t just sit back and complain about work. Even when life is tough and challenging, they dream, they think, they do, and they kick butt too. Of course, even successful people are prone to failure. But when they do fail, it’s not that big of a deal because they are resilient. They are successful at work and life.

What’s their secret? It’s neither dumb luck nor is it their connections. Those that find success do so because of their healthy mindsets and winning rituals.

A mindset is an attitude and a belief.

Rituals are what you do to set yourself up for success when nobody’s looking.

The good news is that even in a volatile, uncertain, complex, and ambiguous world, you can always improve your outcome and move towards success  by adopting a healthy mindset and winning rituals. Doing so will carry over to your personal and professional lives. I promise.

In the milestone episode of Let’s Fix Work, I shared three mindset tips I’ve learned from friends, colleagues, and guests. My tips will help you reflect where you spend your time, rethink who gets your attention, and encourage you to be of service to those around you. Click here to give it a listen.

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This week on Let’s Fix Work, I am joined by Dr. Daniel Crosby. Dan is an author, psychologist, and Chief Behavioral Officer at Brinker Capital. His primary focus is in behavioral economics and understanding how we make decisions around money. Dan and I met almost a decade ago, at a time when the economy wasn’t doing very well. Since then he has published two books on the topic of wealth, money, and psychology. In this episode, we talk about behavioral economics in the workplace and why it all matters.

If you are interested in the role behavioral economics plays in the market, the workplace, and how it affects our decisions, tune into this episode of Let’s Fix Work.

In this episode, you’ll hear:

  1. Can we be doing better with our money?
  2. Willpower and why relationships and context matters
  3. Freewill, do we still have it?
  4. We answer the question, is the market consistently eroding what’s in our best interests?
  5. Designing better employment experiences
  6. The role and responsibility of people in power

On decision making: “Putting yourself in the right situations is a very big deal because we have limited willpower.  Surrounding yourself with good people and being in good places is more than half the battle.” Dr. Daniel Crosby

Resources from this episode:

Thank you to our sponsor: Ultimatesoftware.com/LFW

Dan Crosby TW twitter.com/danielcrosby

Dan Crosby LI www.linkedin.com/in/danielcrosby

Dan Crosby Books:

The Behavioral Investor amzn.to/2STAo7q

The Laws of Wealth: Psychology and the secret to investing success  amzn.to/2VPVK7C

Everyone You Love Will Die www.kickstarter.com/projects/458001451/everyone-you-love-will-die

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We’re proud to be sponsored by Ultimate Software. They’re a leading cloud provider of people management solutions with a commitment to continuing education for HR, talent, and payroll professionals.

Ultimate Software is hosting dozens of free educational HR workshops around the country. Check out ultimatesoftware.com/LFW for more information on how to earn free HRCI, SHRM, and APA recertification credits.

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Most companies want to create positive work environments for their employees, right? After all, they want workers to be happy, but are they creating “fearless” environments? Recently on an episode of Let’s Fix Work, I welcomed Professor Amy Edmondson from Harvard Business School. She is the author of The Fearless Organization: Creating Psychological Safety in the Workplace for Learning, Innovation, and Growth. Her book discusses creating a psychologically safe workplace that invites employee participation and innovation. We took a look at the state of work environments today and the need for change.

During the conversation, we discussed many topics regarding psychological safety, which, according to Amy, is a climate where people feel that their voice is welcome and they know, “They not only can, but they are expected to bring their ideas, their questions, their concerns,

and even their failures to the table.” This embodies the idea that everyone has thoughts about their workplace, from ways to improve morale to ideas on how to make the business better. But, sometimes workers may feel afraid to speak up. Why is that? Fear of failure or bad consequences at work can keep workers silent. The company could be missing out on good ideas. After all, as Amy pointed out, if someone is in a state of fear, their brain doesn’t work well and they may be holding back…not expressing the ideas that could be so beneficial for the boss to hear.

So, what do we do about this, and how can we create a fearless environment at work? Amy says there are three things that a boss can do right now to work towards this: set the stage, invite participation, and respond productively.

First, let’s explore setting the stage: This involves opening up to employees and telling them that you, as the boss, don’t have all the answers. That you don’t have any magical way of seeing into the future to know what the solution to an issue may be and that others are welcome to bring forward their ideas. That’s setting the stage – letting others know that you are open to hearing what they say.

Next up, inviting participation: Which means asking employees for specifics of what they are seeing in their jobs or for their input on the topics being considered. Actively asking questions and listening to the answers.

And finally the last item Amy discussed, responding productively: If people present you with some bad news, don’t overreact or lash out. Instead, as Amy says, “Take a deep breath,” and listen to the whole situation. It could be an opportunity to work together to find a resolution to whatever the problem is.

Good leaders use self-control and self-awareness. Only then can they be truly aware of others and appreciate their efforts, as the leader can’t do all the work alone. Amy says, “Understanding that fundamentally as a leader, your job is to harness the efforts of others.” That’s the bottom line. It’s important to work towards a positive work environment that not only welcomes but encourages input from employees…fearlessly.

If you’d like to hear more details about creating a fearless organization, check out the podcast episode with Amy Edmondson, here.

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This week’s episode is special because we have hit our 50th episode milestone!  I am thrilled that our Let’s Fix Work community is thriving. Today, I want to focus on doing the inner work so that you can have the best year yet. As I always say, we fix work by fixing ourselves.

In this episode, I share my top three mindset tips I’ve learned from friends, colleagues, and guests on this podcast. My tips will help you reflect where you spend your time, rethink who gets your attention, and encourage you to be of service to those around you. So if you are ready to make a lot of money, kick butt, and take names, then sit back and listen to this episode of Let’s Fix Work.

In this episode, you’ll hear:

  1. What having a healthy mindset has to do with success
  2. Rethinking the way you manage your time and expectations
  3. Setting clear expectations on performance and stop wasting emotional and physical energy on poor performers
  4. The importance of reimagining your brand and being of service

Resources from this episode:

Thank our sponsor: Ultimatesoftware.com/LFW

Jesse Itzler jesseitzler.com/

Kevin Kruse www.kevinkruse.com/

Laurie Ruettimann laurieruettimann.com 

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We’re proud to be sponsored by Ultimate Software. They’re a leading cloud provider of people management solutions with a commitment to continuing education for HR, talent, and payroll professionals.

Ultimate Software is hosting dozens of free educational HR workshops around the country. Check out ultimatesoftware.com/LFW for more information on how to earn free HRCI, SHRM, and APA recertification credits.

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Recently on the Let’s Fix Work podcast, I had the pleasure of chatting with radio personality, Ryan Arnold. He’s a longtime friend and DJ at WXRT, Chicago’s Finest Rock. He’s also the founder of Desoto and State Communications. We talked about what it’s like to have a dream job and how health insurance makes dreams possible. We also covered side hustles, entrepreneurship, and the art and act of service. What I found most fascinating and endearing about Ryan was his passion for communicating on behalf of the little guy. Through his communications company, Desoto and State Communications, Ryan helps nonprofits with their marketing and communication.

Ryan said, “There are so many not for profit organizations in the world, in Chicago especially, that serve a micro community. And those organizations, they’re doing good work. But, they’re not going to get recognized by media. They’re not going to have an article written about the Executive Director. For example, a nonprofit bringing mobile health facilities to underprivileged neighborhoods. They deserve attention.”

And Ryan is a born communicator, it’s in his DNA (as you’ll hear me say time and again in our interview together). So I was not too shocked to learn this about him.

Ryan used his knowledge of media, his knowledge and experience in advertising and marketing to serve nonprofit organizations. What started as something as simple as helping someone write a press release turned into a company. His business is thriving and he is doing important work.

So why am I sharing this with you today? Because with every conversation we hear and have, (in this podcast or in the workplace) there is something to be learned. In this case, it’s understanding that your abilities can be used to affect the world around you, in a good way. In Ryan’s case, he “helps the little guys get their fair share of the pie.”

What are you doing to make the world around you, your organization, your workplace, and also your community, better? If you’re not of service as an entrepreneur, what are you doing?

If you want to hear more of my conversation with Ryan and all about how dream jobs happen with health insurance from a smooth-talking radio personality and PR professional, then listen to this episode of Let’s Fix Work, here.

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In this episode of Let’s Fix Work, I talk with Professor Amy Edmondson from Harvard Business School and author of The Fearless Organization: Creating Psychological Safety in the Workplace for Learning, Innovation, and Growth. HR leaders and executives love this book, and they love Amy for her rigorous take on what it means to create a high performing and humane work environment. Her name and ideas come up in my social circles over and over again. I’ve come to know of Amy’s work through many women that I admire. And since it’s really important to them, it’s equally important to me.

So if you are interested in psychological safety, inviting participation, and creating a productive workplace of tomorrow, then listen to this week’s episode of Let’s Fix Work.

In this episode you’ll hear:

  1. Why organizations are fearful in the workplace today
  2. Why people need to understand that our human instincts, and especially our human instincts in hierarchies, are at odds with our organizational goals
  3. The definition of psychological safety
  4. How we reconcile psychological safety and corporate social responsibility
  5. That psychological safety tends to be quite variable across groups in an organization
  6. How leaders in the middle have figured out that they want their group, their part of the organization to be engaged, dynamic, energized, and candid
  7. People need to feel free to be candid and feel free to offer candid feedback
  8. How leaders can create that fearless organization, what it looks like, and some concepts leaders can use
  9. Being a leader is so different than it was even 10 years ago, and it requires such an exceptional and extraordinary skill set
  10. What the fundamental job of a leader is today

“How can you create the conditions whereby we can show up and do the work we need to do, but also keep thinking about how will we be doing it better tomorrow?” ~ Professor Amy Edmondson

“Set the stage, invite participation, and respond productively.” ~ Professor Amy Edmondson

Resources from this episode:

Thank you to our sponsor: Ultimatesoftware.com/LFW

Amy at Harvard Business School: www.hbs.edu/faculty/Pages/profile.aspx?facId=6451

Amy on LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/amedmondson/

The Fearless Organization: Creating Psychological Safety in the Workplace for Learning, Innovation, and Growth: amzn.to/2XntpqW

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We’re proud to be sponsored by Ultimate Software. They’re a leading cloud provider of people management solutions with a commitment to continuing education for HR, talent, and payroll professionals.

Ultimate Software is hosting dozens of free educational HR workshops around the country. Check out ultimatesoftware.com/LFW for more information on how to earn free HRCI, SHRM, and APA recertification credits.

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In a recent episode of Let’s Fix Work, I welcomed entrepreneur and technologist, Armen Berjikly. Armen serves as the Senior Director of Growth Strategy at Ultimate Software, where his expertise in human-computer interactions drives Ultimate’s artificial intelligence platform and direction. Through my own work, I have realized that there are many people in the workplace, in the world of Human Resources, and tech that don’t understand how Artificial Intelligence (AI) can aid us in the workforce. So I was pleased to have Armen as a guest, because in my mind he is an expert in AI.

While Armen and I touched on many facets of artificial intelligence throughout our conversation, today I want to focus on how AI can help human resources professionals make better decisions more fairly and with competence.

Let’s start with unconscious biases. Unconscious biases are social stereotypes about certain groups of people that individuals form outside their own conscious awareness. Everyone holds unconscious beliefs about various social and identity groups, and these biases stem from one’s tendency to organize social worlds by categorizing.*

Now let’s see how unconscious biases can have a role in workplace decisions. Every employee has to make decisions all day long. If we’re honest, we make them under duress, right? We have time limitations, resource limitations, information limitations. We have personal limitations. These are all situations where professionals have to make judgment under less than perfect conditions, day in and day out.

And when under pressure, as HR Professionals, we may lean on unconscious bias to help us make decisions. As Armen points out, “That doesn’t seem fair.  It doesn’t feel good, and it’s really doesn’t lead to the best workplace environment.”

These are areas where we struggle as people, but a machine does not.

A machine does not have unconscious bias.

Armen says, “What we can do with artificial intelligence is that we can help people make the decisions they need with more competence. We can help them make those decisions more fairly. We can help them make those decisions with more computer evidence behind it and we can make it personalized to their situations. That is the general AI approach, get away from judgment [and instead use AI to help aid us] to make decisions at work.”

By using artificial intelligence to help us make those decisions, we can begin to remove unconscious bias from our decision making, thus fostering a more fair and competent environment.

If you’re interested in learning more about using AI in the workforce, the reality and hope, then listen to this episode of Let’s Fix Work, here.

Source: diversity.ucsf.edu/resources/unconscious-bias

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We’re proud to be sponsored by Ultimate Software. They’re a leading cloud provider of people management solutions with a commitment to continuing education for HR, talent, and payroll professionals.

Ultimate Software is hosting dozens of free educational HR workshops around the country. Check out ultimatesoftware.com/LFW for more information on how to earn free HRCI, SHRM, and APA recertification credits.

This week I’m talking to radio personality, Ryan Arnold. He’s a longtime friend and DJ at WXRT, Chicago’s Finest Rock. He’s also the founder of Desoto and State Communications. In today’s show, we talk about what it’s like to have a dream job and how health insurance makes dreams possible. We also cover side hustles, entrepreneurship, and the art and act of service.

If you want to hear how dream jobs happen with health insurance from a smooth-talking radio personality and PR professional, then sit back and listen to this episode of Let’s Fix Work.

In this episode you’ll hear:

  1. Ryan’s love of communicating,presenting, and being a personality: when he decided he was going to be in radio
  2. His experience during the Great Recession, unable to find a job in radio and taking a job as a heavy equipment operator
  3. The important lesson of checking ego at the door and coming back to earth
  4. Benefitting from and having your world change from access to healthcare
  5. The normal culture of a radio station versus the culture at WXRT
  6. Having a dream job and Ryan’s thought about it all
  7. Ryan’s passion for communicating on behalf of the little guy
  8. Ryan’s PR company, Desoto and State: why the company exists, who they work with, and the work they do

“I’m privileged to do this every day. I walk into the Prudential Building where the station is located, my key card beeps and I walk into the studio. I’m grateful every day.” Ryan Arnold, DJ at WXRT

Resources from this episode:

Thank you to our sponsor: Ultimatesoftware.com/LFW

Desoto And State Communications: desotostate.com/

Ryan on WXRT: wxrt.radio.com/hosts/ryan-arnold

Ryan on Twitter: twitter.com/RyanArnoldRocks

Ryan on Instagram: www.instagram.com/ryanarnoldrocks/

2112: 2112inc.com

Maggie Rogers: www.maggierogers.com

Courtney Barnett: courtneybarnett.com.au

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Most professionals don’t go into a leadership position thinking about the ways in which they can kill their new career. But what if you knew beforehand the skills needed to be a successful leader, ones that could potentially help you avoid a “crash and burn” career? Well, that’s exactly what Martin Moore, founder and CEO of Your CEO Mentor, and I discussed in a recent episode of Let’s Fix Work. In this blog post, I want to share two common misconceptions made by leaders.

Misconception #1: Communicating Effectively
When it comes to communicating as a leader, Martin says it’s important to realize that being able to talk is not the only skill needed. He says, “It’s about listening and understanding the people that you’re talking to. And, you need to have the ability to get the most out of your people by having the leadership dialogue that brings out their best.”

Communication is a two-way street and is also more complex than the word implies. The most effective leaders have the ability to listen, understand, and empathize with their team members.

Misconception #2: Building a High Performing Team
Building a high performing team is a lot harder than it sounds, according to Martin. He goes on to say that many leaders say they have built a high performing team, but when you quiz them on it, they don’t really know what that means.

So what does it mean to have a high quality team? Credentials on a resume, work experience, and awards or recognition does not solely make a high quality team. In fact, you can still have amazing talent on your team. But Martin says, “It boils down to people being happy, getting on well together, AND actually delivering the outcomes that’s required of them by the organization.”

Knowledge is power, right? I believe understanding leadership misconceptions is paramount to your success as a leader. To learn is to grow and by growing, you open the doors to becoming the best leader you can be. And I ask you, if you’re not learning or growing, what are you doing?

If you’re looking to improve your leadership skills and want to hear from a man who knows a thing or two about leadership (and has a killer Australian accent), then head over here to listen to this episode of Let’s Fix Work.

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