Posts by: Megan Doherty

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Are we ready for change? Are we prepared to do what it takes to make the American dream come alive again? It would take some drastic reforms to get those much-needed results. Something’s got to give, and this administration has to go. Today’s guest is Andrew Yang. He’s Asian-American, a 2020 Presidential Candidate, a serial entrepreneur, and a man who actually understands people, numbers, and technology. In other words, the complete opposite of Trump. Laurie and Andrew talk about progressive platforms that will spark the change we need to get us back into shape.

  • Andrew agrees that work is broken. The times are changing and we need to transform how we think about work to get any real benefit from it. We’re going through the greatest economic and technological transition in human history. The problem, now, is that our government doesn’t understand this shift. They are stuck working with obsolete concepts that will eventually break the economy – and not in a good way.
  • When change isn’t happening, you’ve got to make change happen yourself. Capitalism has worked effectively for corporations but often crushes human welfare. Capitalism prioritizes efficiency and profits over everything else. How do we fix this? Andrew proposes a new form of capitalism that gets the market to work for us and not against us. He calls it “Human Capitalism,” which focuses on maximizing human well-being and fulfillment. Andrew further explains the tenets of human-centered capitalism.
  • Laurie and Andrew talk about the “Freedom Dividend.” A proposed policy wherein every American adult gets $1,000 per month – no questions asked. Andrew believes that if we were to remove the existential threat of poverty, people could focus on finding jobs that better fit their skill sets. The Freedom Dividend is actually an old idea, but a similar policy has been effective in Alaska for almost four decades. Andrew talks about the value of revisiting this idea and how it will benefit US citizens.
  • How do we get Value Added Tax into the dividend equation without people worrying about the deficits? Andrew shares how the present mismanagement must not lead us to believe that we lack the resources to progress. Our economy is on a record high, so the fear is based on the current mess the government is in. By using VAT funds to invest in our citizens, several other issues will start toppling down.
  • Laurie and Andrew talk about the problems in the work environment. If our economy is doing so well, why can’t we do justice to make our citizens’ quality of life better? We’re not living in the dark ages, and yet, most of the same issues are present. Seriously, how can the world’s richest country be so anti-women, anti-family, and anti-poor? It’s time we take into consideration what’s good for the people versus what makes the most money for companies. After all, since this country’s greatest asset is its people, it should be a no-brainer to invest in making their lives more meaningful.

The DIY HR Handbook

Wouldn’t you love to get your hands on Laurie’s no-holds-barred, honest DIY HR Handbook for employees and pros alike? Download it for free!

Andrew Yang

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The world is changing, and us with it. We are living our lives 50% in the real world, and the other half in the virtual world. With the internet connecting the two, it’s harder than ever to imagine one without the other. While it seems like we’re more connected than ever, in truth, our communication has become LESS personal. We’re joined today by Dr. Nick Morgan, who discusses the pros and cons of how we connect with people, despite the limitations of virtual communication.

  • Dr. Nick Morgan recently wrote a book titled, “Can You Hear Me? How To Connect With People In A Virtual World.” He tells us the story that inspired him to write this book, and how it can change your perception of unconscious communication.
  • How is technology making communication worse? Believe it or not, it’s not auto-correct. Nick reveals one of the biggest problems with online communication: people use the same language pattern they use face-to-face, and due to the lack of emotional subtext, we often misunderstand people’s intent. We go on a default “nasty” setting because our brain has filled the gap with negative information to anticipate danger and ‘protect’ ourselves. This is why we’re likely to be less trusting online than we are in the real world.
  • What makes for effective virtual communication? Nick talks about how our reaction depends on how we’re perceiving the other person – if we default to distrust, our reaction mirrors that. Fortunately, we’re becoming more aware of our behavior online. By extending more empathy and understanding, we’re becoming better adults.
  • What’s the benefit of communicating in person? When we meet people in person, it is easier to establish a meaningful connection than we can do online – this takes a lot longer virtually. Nick shares how this is especially useful for first meetings.
  • It would seem that despite the ease of communicating online, we are more alone and our relationships have become much harder to maintain. How do we fix this and be better at labeling the emotional undertones in our virtual conversations? It comes down to one thing at a time – a whole bunch of little fixes that focus on being more understanding and a little bit more connected.
  • Nick and Laurie talk about how the power of well-placed humor can strengthen online relationships, and the importance of understanding where the overlap lies between the real world and the online world.

The DIY HR Handbook

Wouldn’t you love to get your hands on Laurie’s no-holds-barred, honest DIY HR Handbook for employees and pros alike? Download it for free!

Dr. Nick Morgan

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Can You Hear Me?

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Are you living your dream or someone else’s? What does it really take to land a promising writing career in 2018? Joining Laurie today is sports journalist and New York Times best-selling author Jeff Pearlman. They talk about Jeff’s amazing journey from screw up to best-selling author, the gig economy and the decline in the journalism industry, and the connection between politics and sports. You’ll discover why it matters that we speak out about important topics.

  • Jeff Pearlman’s “Football for a Buck: The Crazy Rise and Crazier Demise of the USFL,” promptly rose to become a best-seller. The content was drawn from over 400 interviews of unadulterated, unforgettable, and downright scandalous stories. Who wouldn’t want a copy? But no one becomes a best-selling author overnight. After all, writing is all about incremental learning. As you work the process, you’re always learning and growing. Jeff talks about his writing roots and how his career came to be.
  • The gig economy is upon us, and journalists haven’t been spared. Legends in the industry have been laid off and replaced with folks who will do the job well below the salary of a seasoned writer. The problem isn’t even about companies letting the tenured writers go in favor of the 20-something-year-olds. It’s that readers can’t seem to tell or feel the difference. Jeff and Laurie weigh in on what the future of work will be like for the next generation, and how we can prepare them for it.
  • Who would believe that politics and sports share such deep ties? Some people want to separate it — like  church and state — but according to Jeff, you can’t separate the two. Jeff and Laurie dive into the interesting connections and the nitty-gritty that binds the people, sports, and politics together.

The DIY HR Handbook

Wouldn’t you love to get your hands on Laurie’s no-holds-barred, honest DIY HR Handbook for employees and pros alike? Download it for free!

Jeff Pearlman

Football for a Buck: The Crazy Rise and Crazier Demise of the USFL

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Isn’t it about time we had a corporate mindset shift? Because come on! There’s more to work than giving the company your heart and soul. Jon Fortt, co-anchor of CNBC’s “Squawk Alley,” joins Laurie to talk about what’s going right, what went wrong, and what’s broken in the world of work. They talk about the reshaping of the traditional corporate mindset, #MeToo, wages, and the future of work.

  • Jon Fortt is the host of Fortt Knox, a podcast dedicated to interviewing the highest achievers in the business, entertainment, philanthropy, and sports industries. His show gives us a sneak peek into these industry giants’ lives and businesses while tackling the most interesting business and economic issues.
  • How can we emulate the best leaders in the industry? Jon shares his take on how today’s leaders are rethinking and reshaping the traditional corporate mindset. He shares how two outstanding leaders are breaking the mold of tradition with their business approach: Microsoft CEO, Satya Nadella, and Stitch Fix CEO, Katrina Lake.
  • The #MeToo movement and stagnant wages are big issues in the global community. Jon shares his thoughts on corporate culture and respect. He also talks about why leaders should have plans to address and mitigate these issues.
  • The tribe seems split when it comes to the flat wages issue. When labor demand is high but the employment rate is low, wages are at an all-time high. Although some companies are working to amend this for their employees’ benefit, others see it as more of an expense. Jon believes it shouldn’t be about hard data. Things like empathy and creativity are deeply important in any industry or organization.
  • Laurie and Jon talk about the future of work and what he thinks about the next 10-20 years. People are worried that robots will be taking their jobs, but Jon believes that isn’t true. Instead, he believes there’s plenty of space for people because businesses need employees who are able to think about how their job impacts their role, the CEO, and the business.

The DIY HR Handbook

Wouldn’t you love to get your hands on Laurie’s no-holds-barred, honest DIY HR Handbook for employees and pros alike? Download it for free!

Jon Fortt

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Fortt Knox: Satya Nadella Interview

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Annette Fortt

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“Let’s empower men!” said no one ever. It’s 2018 and we’re still struggling with equality and other social stigmas that come from centuries of brainwashing. But if men are so great, why are they vulnerable to depression and anxiety? Why are we glorifying aggression as something innate to males, and why aren’t we doing anything to change it? Today’s guest is Jake Stika, a ‘Next Generation Man’ who wants to rethink what masculinity means and how we can put an end to toxicity.

  • Who is Jake Stika and how is Next Gen Men fixing work? Jake Stika is the Co-Founder and Executive Director of this nonprofit organization that is engaging, educating, and empowering men and boys about gender in schools, communities, and workplaces. He has earned recognition from Ashoka, the British Council, the Canadian Centre for Diversity and Inclusion, and has spoken as part of the Canadian delegation at the United Nations.
  • Jake believes that men can do better, but not under the pretense that men are inherently bad. He thinks there’s room for men to improve on how they think, behave, and contribute to what is socially and culturally perceived as masculine. It’s also imperative that the rest of us change the way we think and act to help support them.
  • Think about how YOU perceive masculinity. Unless you’re exceptionally progressive, you’re probably part of a culture that has a certain idea of what ‘real men’ ought to be. Males are tough, strong, and able to do everything by themselves. Boys don’t cry. They should “man up.” But it’s these unreasonable expectations that set them up for failure.
  • Even the statistics back this up. As a rule, men are incarcerated more often, end up homeless, and are more susceptible to violence. Clearly, something is wrong with the way we raise and treat our males, and in the expectations that we hold for them.
  • How does such backward, medieval thinking even exist today? Jake blames it on all the little nudges boys get exposed to throughout their lives. Males have adapted this toxic mindset from years of conditioning, not just from the other men in their lives, but from women as well. It’s a difficult mindset to break for all of us.
  • Jake was no stranger to this toxicity. He recounts his own experience growing up. Boys who cannot comply with this social standard end up broken. And these broken boys grow up as broken men. Then they enter the community and end up contributing to the noxious cycle.

It won’t be an easy fix. We all have to contribute to rehabilitating our men so they can become better. In doing so, we are raising men who become champions of empowering all genders to thrive in society. Just as it has taken years to ‘break’ these boys, it will take years to build them back up again. We have to stop isolating men by making them live in accordance with the accepted singularity of masculinity. Instead, we should encourage and embrace their “masculinities.”

The DIY HR Handbook

Wouldn’t you love to get your hands on Laurie’s no-holds-barred, honest DIY HR Handbook for employees and pros alike? Download it for free!

Jake Stika

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Would it surprise you if we said that a large number of female leaders in America were Girl Scouts? Sylvia is a Rocket Scientist, STEM Leader, and Tech Founder, and she’s also the Girl Scouts of America’s CEO. Join Laurie and Sylvia as they unravel the GSUSA’s vital role in the development of next-gen leaders and how they sustain their programs.

Dynamic leadership programs, time-tested methods, and supportive learning environments: this is what separates the GSUSA from other institutions. And how can we ever forget their famous cookies? Amazing products aside, do you know what their finest contribution to society is? It’s their active role in developing the next generation of leaders, innovators and impact makers. But how do they do it?

  • The industrial age is almost over. Job opportunities have become reliant on technology. But in our attempt to move forward and develop new technology, today’s workforce is struggling to keep up with the changes. Very few women are in the technology industry’s talent pipeline and this often diminishes the female perspective in the workforce equation.
  • So how can the GSUSA and other institutions impact the current state of the workforce? They invest in building core leadership skills in young girls. This enables them to become functional key members in their organizations. They cultivate entrepreneurial skills from selling cookies, and as simple as it sounds, the effect is profound. They also empower girls to be action takers and decision makers in a supportive environment. They even have a STEM program that develops their skill and confidence to take part in the science and technology industries.
  • With that said, would it be much of a surprise to know that Sylvia was once a girl scout too?! Sylvia traces the development of her leadership skills back to when she was reciting the Girl Scout pledge. GSUSA was the type of environment that nurtured her transformative ideas, drive, and compassion. Now she is as an esteemed entrepreneur, rocket scientist, and thought leader.
  • As the CEO of the Girl Scouts of America, Sylvia has done a lot to improve existing programs. She’s a staunch supporter of implementing STEM programs to spark the girls’ curiosity. She believed that there was a way to make the learning experience fun and relevant. They’ve even released new badges reflecting the latest programs. Needless to say, Sylvia is very progressive and optimistic that it will improve in the future.
  • How can their positive impact be measured? What is the evidence that they are successful in their pursuit of excellence? The Girl Scouts Bronze, Silver, and Gold Awards are granted to girls who have developed potentially world-changing projects with promising long-term positive effects in their respective communities.

We hope you have learned how these institutions play a crucial part in improving the work cycle. It’s not just about Thin Mints and Samoas. The bottom line is that empowering women will radically change the workforce AND the world.

The DIY HR Handbook

Wouldn’t you love to get your hands on Laurie’s no-holds-barred, honest DIY HR Handbook for employees and pros alike? Download it for free!

Sylvia Acevedo

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Did you know that a business has many of the same dynamics as a marriage? Everything that happens in a marriage (the good and the bad) is no different from what you can expect when running a business. Now, if you think keeping your business and marriage afloat is tough, just wait until you come face to face with toxic masculinity in the workplace. There’s never a dull moment in today’s podcast as Laurie invites President of RecruitingDaily.com, William Tincup, to dive into the art and science of entrepreneurship — and how we have to do better to end toxic male behavior in the workplace.

  • Laurie has known William Tincup for years and regards him as a friend and a mentor, a man of many talents who has always given her sound advice based on his many years of experience as an entrepreneur.
  • Today, William and Laurie share their experiences and take a critical look at startups, entrepreneurship, and how to address and amend toxic masculinity in the workplace. They also talk a little about art!
  • A business is a vehicle for relationships where people exchange services for monetary gain. But before you dive into creating a business, you always have to START somewhere first. There are several things to consider before starting a business and, contrary to popular belief, you do not make it as an entrepreneur with sheer passion alone. You can’t give what you don’t have, so if you only have the passion to run your business, it’s going to fall short on other aspects.

Critical considerations that are required before creating your own startup:

  • What do you name your company? Do you take the realistic route, where your website name spells out what services you provide? Or do you go for the more abstract approach and come up with a witty made-up word that tells a good story about what your company does? Well, of course, the name of your business is important, but it’s not nearly as vital as your business’s brand being memorable. Both choices have their merits, as long as you create a memorable business, service and brand.
  • Likeability + Compelling = Memorable… and then convert “memorable” into revenue. You’ll need to find the perfect balance between the art and the science of a startup. Think of it this way: the “Science” aspect is product development, the “Art” aspect is marketing and delivering the product – both need to be in sync with each other for the coherent whole to work.
  • Great communication is where most companies struggle. William Tincup forwards one reason for this poor communication: that men are not exactly the best communicators. It is difficult for them to learn to apologize, and sometimes even give a proper compliment when it is merited. So, what can men do to change for the better? Tincup has one crucial strategy to begin: men need to STOP interrupting, talking over, and ignoring women when they are sharing their ideas and opinions. No more mansplaining, guys! And it’s up to other men to call it out in their peers.
  • There’s nothing easy about being an entrepreneur. You need to put in your best effort to service your customers and treat your employees well. The hustle never stops and the decisions don’t come easy. If you’re launching a startup because you think it’s going to be easy, consider this your first warning!

There is so much work left ahead of us to make work a better place for all. It can be discouraging, which is why it’s extremely important to remember that nothing worth doing is ever easy. Keep fighting the good entrepreneurial fight — it’s never too late to do your part to fix work for everyone.

The DIY HR Handbook

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William Tincup

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When kindred spirits come together in a community, ideas and dreams blossom, passion gets amplified, accountability and empowerment surges, and the problems? Well, they become less daunting. In this episode, Laurie has a great conversation with a dear friend, a cult legend in the online-community building world, Ryan Paugh. Laurie and Ryan share how they met, what Ryan’s role is as a community builder, and why communities are essential in fixing the broken wheel that is work.

  • After a few years of working for corporate America, Ryan dove into the startup arena where he felt his passion for helping others would contribute more – this was his first step in his epic entrepreneurial journey.
  • He created Brazen Careerist, which started out as a community for young professionals looking to find their place in the corporate world, where they can find answers and support from peers and other like-minded individuals. Long story short, Brazen was a success but eventually rebranded into an SAS technology product, which now serves as a peer-to-peer speed networking platform.
  • As the product shifted away from its community-based roots, Ryan decided to walk a different path, but kept the burning passion to create better communities to support the next generation of highly driven leaders. He eventually became the co-founder and COO of The Community Company.
  • Along with his business partner and co-author of Superconnector, Scott Gerber, they went on to build several outstanding communities for different organizations like business executives, youth leaders, and entrepreneurs such as YEC and the Forbes Council which includes the Forbes Human Resources Council, where members are encouraged to support, engage, and pick each other’s brains.
  • Why did Ryan focus on community building? Well, everyone is part of a community in some way or another. We are social beings after all. Ryan believes that in being part of a community, we are given the opportunity to learn and impart vital lessons and experiences that nurture us into the people we are now. He says, “Give,” because he believes that there’s so much more to living than just getting something.
  • Life and people aren’t meant to be boxed up in a simple transaction of give and take. We are much more complex than that – we have feelings, aspirations, and lives outside of the grind. This is why Ryan feels work has more… work to do in a community and culture building aspect. “You’re here to work and not to make friends,” is a typical feel at the office, but we DO need to build relationships in the workplace to grow into more productive members of the organization.
  • Work is broken because it has been reduced to a means to an end; a paycheck for hours, nothing more than a simple transaction of, “if you do this, you get this.”
  • Laurie shares Ryan’s sentiment that there’s more to work than just earning the money. That by limiting someone’s identity to a mere “bringer of bacon” a.k.a “corporate zombie” they have subsequently limited that individual’s potential to contribute to the organization’s greater cause. You see, when people see past the money and embrace purpose, when they are allowed to invest in things that they truly value, there’s a greater opportunity to create a positive and lasting legacy for others to follow or replicate.
  • As a veteran community builder, Ryan believes that a good community must have an element of trust from the top-down. Ask anyone who knows Ryan and they’ll immediately say how helpful and encouraging he is despite his being a company co-founder. More than developing the products, organizations should look into nurturing its workers on a deeper level. People at the bottom makes the most impact, so it is important that they are set up for success throughout their stay in the company and, hopefully, even when they transition into something else. He dives deep into this “building relationships that matter” philosophy in his book, Superconnector.
  • Ryan and Laurie are aware though that most people are still stuck in the old ways and find processes to be difficult to build – and even harder to implement – but it doesn’t have to be that way and we can all to do better.

The DIY HR Handbook

Wouldn’t you love to get your hands on Laurie’s no-holds-barred, honest DIY HR Handbook for employees and pros alike? Download it for free!

Ryan Paugh

Superconnector

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We get it. You aren’t a tube of toothpaste. But you still need a personal brand. In fact, you already have one whether you realize it or not. The question is, are you going to take charge of it? Today, Laurie talks with personal brand expert, Jennifer McClure, about what a personal brand is, why you need to develop yours, and how it can help you excel in your professional career.

  • Jennifer will be the first to tell you that she doesn’t like the term “personal brand,” but it’s the best one she’s got. You can also think of it as your reputation, and when you consider it as your professional reputation, that makes it a lot more important, doesn’t it? We’re talking about people wanting to work with or for you, getting clients, being promoted, and more. It’s your career advancement, plain and simple.
  • So how do you develop your personal brand? Think about Oprah Winfrey. She’s got one of the strongest personal brands in the world. Her message, live your best life, is known around the world. But her story hasn’t all been cake and roses; there are some negative experiences associated with her brand, and Jennifer explains how Oprah has dealt with it. She also shares how you can be as intentional as Oprah when you are defining your own personal brand.
  • One big mistake people make is that they try to copy someone else’s personal brand. As you can imagine, that comes off as terribly inauthentic. With that said, you CAN take inspiration from other people. See what they’re doing well, what parts of their message resonates with you. What can you adopt while still keeping your uniqueness at the forefront? Laurie and Jennifer discuss, and Jennifer also reveals who she considered her mentor and sought to emulate.
  • There are another few traps you’ll need to avoid in developing your personal brand: don’t overthink it or force it, and make sure your actions and words line up. A good way to tell is whether you’re getting the opportunities you want. Do people describe you the way you intended them to? How do your colleagues introduce you? Jennifer talks about what to do if your personal brand isn’t working for you.
  • Laurie shares the story of trying to be the buttoned-up, serious HR lady for the book she’s writing, and how she couldn’t even finish it until she did what came naturally, and that was to be herself. Jennifer chimes in with some very insightful thoughts on Laurie’s personal brand and what makes it so strong.
  • The tables are turned, and Laurie asks Jennifer what her own personal brand is. The response is humbling, and it’s exactly how YOU should think about how to live with your own brand. More importantly, how to take control of it. One of the key takeaways is that sometimes your brand needs to be audience-specific.
  • Sometimes we don’t like the reputations we have. It’s a challenge to change them; once another person has formed their idea of you, it’s a mental shortcut they’ll use repeatedly because it’s easier. So how do you go about changing your own personal brand if you don’t like it? Laurie digs in with a tough question, and Jennifer steps up to answer it without hesitation, and it’s an answer you need to hear if the attention you’re getting isn’t the attention you want.
  • Finally, we need to broach the topic of negative feedback that isn’t deserved. Jennifer shares the story of her first major keynote speech and the one comment afterward that has haunted her to this day. Laurie has a story to share, too, and they talk about what to do when people try to label you in ways that hurt.

The DIY HR Handbook

Wouldn’t you love to get your hands on Laurie’s no-holds-barred, honest DIY HR Handbook for employees and pros alike? Download it for free!

Jennifer McClure

FREE DOWNLOAD: Personal Brand Workbook

Impact Makers Podcast

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Don MacPherson is an entrepreneur who built a company called Modern Survey, which he successfully sold without laying people off or taking on debt. That’s the American Dream. But Don’s not resting on his laurels. Growing up in a mining community, Don learned the value of work early and isn’t interested in status symbols like cars and clothes. He’s soon launching a new venture called 12 Geniuses focused on fixing the future of work for everybody. He’s here to talk about his journey in tech, how to be ruthlessly pragmatic with your finances, and how you can set yourself up financially for success. Ultimately, it’s about enjoying your work. Don has a unique view of the world that you need to hear, especially if you want to retire early.

  • First things first: Don isn’t a Millennial tech bro. He’s close to 50 with a wealth of experience in customer service, technology, healthcare, employee engagement, and even truck driving. Don will tell you he isn’t a natural entrepreneur, but he is a risk taker. So much so he decided to move to Germany and only bought a one-way ticket. Don shares the story of living in an attic.
  • When he returned from Germany, he took a job with American Express, and that was when Don met his future business partner, a contractor who was living the dream. Don wanted that dream life, so together, he and his partner founded an online survey company, Modern Survey, in 1999. Their startup money was $1,000 each. He took this company through to a successful exit, the American dream.
  • Don could easily rest on his laurels now, but he’s starting another company instead. There’s a driving force that keeps him moving: yes, he’s a risk taker and he loves his work, but deep down, he loves helping people reach their potential. Don believes that EVERYONE can perform at extraordinary levels, and he explains how.
  • One of Don’s guiding principles is that he pays himself first. It’s enabled him to do everything that he’s wanted. Interestingly, the thought was planted by a commercial he saw as a teenager. It was a simple commercial and the gist of it was to get started and begin saving early. Don reveals how he applied this to his life from a young age, and what “you pay you first” really means.
  • For Don, money is freedom. He doesn’t come from a family of savers, though, and what he understood from his younger years was that you took the job that paid the most money. It was essential to have an incredible work ethic, too. But taking a job that pays the most cash is how you survived. Don realized, though, that work could be so much more. It can be fulfilling, and having money allowed him to experiment and do things he couldn’t have otherwise.
  • There came a time when Don’s business almost failed, and he tells the story of how he had to abandon his “you pay you first” philosophy for a time. He and his partners had to each put in a hundred grand to save the company, and it was only because he had been so disciplined in his savings that he was able to do it. And that was how the company pulled through the tough time.
  • We’ve hinted at how Don’s success hasn’t encouraged him to be spendy. Quite the opposite, in fact. Don never invested in a brand new car, and the duplex he lived in for 15 years was partly financed by the renters he had living in the second apartment. Don shares some of his other money hacks he used to amass his wealth. He even delayed parenthood until he was nearly 50.
  • If you take Don’s advice, he believes you will never have to work at a job you don’t like. And that is powerful, especially in this era of work being broken. He talks about how we can do our best work when we have a sense of security and freedom that being financially responsible brings. You might be wondering if it’s too late for you. The answer is no, and Don explains why.
  • Have you heard the concept of being a prisoner in a workplace? You’re stuck in a job you can’t leave because you have so many bills to pay. Don says that as many as 1 in 12 workers are prisoners. They’re financially stuck, and they don’t believe they can make more money elsewhere. Most of us agree that work is broken, so you can imagine what happens with work prisoners and how they contribute to that. Equally as important, their home life is also negatively affected.
  • Laurie points out that it’s often more expensive for women in the workplace than men – they have to buy a lot of things men don’t, and as they age, they’re expected to do everything they can to look younger. Clothing, makeup, surgery… and then there’s the issue of maternity and childcare. Given that women don’t make as much as men, can you imagine what it’s like for a single mom? Don shares his thoughts on the workplace for women.
  • Don’s new company is called 12 Geniuses (coming soon). He shares exactly what it is and what he does, and you might be surprised by his belief that the world is a better place, despite what the news might have you believe. But did you realize that most people aren’t ready for positive change?

Don MacPherson

LinkedIn

12 Geniuses — COMING SOON

The DIY HR Handbook

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