Life

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I’ve been working on my podcast, this month, and I’ve learned a lot about work, life, and the fantastic people in my network.

My podcast is called Let’s Fix Work.

It will be out at the beginning of April. I’ve been speaking to people with concrete ideas on how to fix work. Rather than a long-winded conversation about how corporate America sucks, it’s been great to have expertise-based discussions with people who are improving it.

There’s less complaining than you’d expect, more conspiring to create change.

So far, my guest list is fabulous: Scott Stratten talking about lighting a match to your career, Scott Santens chatting about basic income, Jason Lauritsen talking about being disruptive and innovative when you’ve got bills to pay, Amanda Hite on being the change while being an adult, Áine Caine and her reporting on work-related stories for Business Insider, and Alyse Kalish of The Muse.

Wait, Are You Just Interviewing White People?

You got me.

My goal is to include different voices, so I’m working on getting an interview with a freelancer’s association that focuses on minority workers and, also, lining up a conversation with someone who thinks that work isn’t necessarily broken and that access to economic opportunity has never been better for women and protected classes.

If you know someone with a specific and distinct point-of-view on how to fix work, I’d love to schedule a conversation. Have ’em hit me up on email or just share this blog post. I don’t know if my podcast will have thousands and thousands of downloads, but it will make a difference with the audience who hears it.

I’m trying to fix work, and, ultimately, fix you by talking to experts that you might find helpful. And because fixing you is a stupid goal, I’m really just trying to fix myself. Isn’t that what life is all about?

Sign up now for more information on Let’s Fix Work and all things LFR.

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Work-life balance is tough for everybody including public speakers. 

It’s hard to maintain relationships when you’re always on the road. Nevermind social media, it’s challenging to stay in contact with colleagues and loved ones when you don’t sit still for five minutes. But it’s vital to make time and be thoughtful with travel and commitments. Otherwise, you’ll miss valuable moments to connect.

That’s why I attempted to see people in New York City, this week. Before I spoke to the patrons of the New Museum, I spent an hour with my ex-boss and future nursing home roommate. Then, after I went on stage, I had a late-night dinner on the lower east side with my niece and nephew.

Because I departed from my introverted work-related routines, I showed up to my speaking gig without my notes. Afterward, I went to dinner in a manic haze and had a difficult time falling asleep when I got to my hotel room around midnight.

But relationships are more important than careers. While it’s tempting to invest all of your time and energy into your job, you need people in your life who will take your phone calls, answer your texts, and bail you out of jail. I call those people my “core four” who will always be there no matter the time or distance.

If you don’t have four close relationships in your life, you have work to do.

And I have work to do with my life. Seeing people before and after work shouldn’t feel disruptive, which is why I want to practice being “social” before and after my events. If I’m living a wandering life, I need people around me who make it less lonely. Can’t lecture people about the “core four” if I’m avoiding social interaction on the road.

So, here’s to better work-life balance in 2018 for all of us including public speakers. If you’re lucky enough to have kick-ass friends and family as I do, making those connections gets easier and more comfortable with practice.

Late-night chips and guacamole — with a lot of laughter — helps! 

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“Another Ruettimann video?”

Yeah, man, another video. I want to relaunch my Punk Rock HR speaking career without calling myself Punk Rock HR. Your interaction (or lack thereof) helps me to understand what works, what doesn’t, and how my fans consume media.

It’s also practice. Over the past three years, I’ve worked on consulting projects and started a tech company. I did all of this, in part, because I wanted nobody to see me. In the video, I talk a little about my fears.

I can’t change the world from behind the laptop in Raleigh, NC. I’m ready to reboot my career and help people think about work. And I can’t do it without showing you how the sausage is made.

So, uh, thanks for enjoying my tubular meat, baby. 

These dumb videos are part of a broader strategy to make a difference in the world. Practicing, communicating, trying to keep my head still and my eye forward. Thank you so much for watching and providing feedback, love and support.

The world of work sucks, and we can fix it. We’ll do it one conversation at a time.

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I believe in healthy, soothing rituals. I’m talking about behaviors and practices meant to achieve physical, spiritual or emotional comfort.

For example, my husband and I try to have dinner on Friday night and then see a movie. Then there’s my grandmother, who had a cup of hot English breakfast tea daily and savored the moment when her cold hands came into contact with the warm mug. Or my friend who wakes up before dawn every weekday and laces up his sneaker to run.

Small and healthy rituals are important. They anchor our minds to the present and provide a modest level of comfort when other aspects of our lives aren’t going so well. If work sucks and your kids are monsters, it feels good to take an evening bath or have that one piece of Dove dark chocolate every day.

That’s why it’s so hard for people to quit smoking and drinking. The self-soothing ritual of the morning cigarette? The glass of champagne at the end of the day? Replacing it with a goddamn cup of tea is dissatisfying, and, honestly, depressing.

But finding a wholesome, daily ritual is worth a look. Whether it’s five minutes in a dark closet where nobody talks to you — or your favorite Starbucks drink on the way to work — there is something out there for everybody. 

You deserve one moment every day that feels great and requires no apologies. I think you can find something special that doesn’t harm your body and soul. One good thing you do for yourself that nobody else can do for you.

That’s my wish for you, today.

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Email marketing works. It might not apply to every segment of the marketplace. But, if you want middle-aged people to buy your goods or services, send them an email. Here’s why.

I’m trying to add more fun back into my marriage, which is going about as well as “forced fun” always goes. I can’t shake my inner HR lady and ask my husband to do random excursions I find on the internet. Weekend trip to a civil rights monument and a cat cafe? Dinner at the art museum? He goes along for the ride. I think it might be helping. At the very least, we’re watching less TV.

Earlier in January, I received an email from my local blow-dry bar. They offered a last-minute discounted appointment for hair, make-up, and a portrait snapped by a local photographer. The combined price alone was less than a day at the spa. I thought, “I’ll look nice, and we can go to dinner on a weekday night.”

The bar for mid-week fun is low. 

I ran over and made myself look pretty for dinner. My hair appointment was great, but the make-up artist did a massive upsell for her services outside of the salon. I don’t blame her — email marketing is a form of business development for local retailers — and I swear she made me look like a forty-five-year-old anchorwoman on purpose. 

The photo captures the essence of wearing your kid’s birthday cake as a primer and foundation. My husband took one look at me and was like, whoa, what’s going on here? Did I miss something?

I’m like, nevermind, let’s get Chinese.

So, while parts of this experience weren’t super-awesome, I’m telling you that email still works. Your agency isn’t lying to you when they recommend list-building and segmenting exercises as best practices. It’s an essential component of a plan to separate your buyers from their money. 

Email works beyond the B2B and B2C realm, too. If you’re a content creator like me, email offers you an opportunity to say hello to your fans and champions. People who believe in your artistry and creativity want to hear from you. Email is the best way to do it.

And if this blow-dry bar emails me with another blow-out deal minus the make-up and photo, I’ll still buy it. Do you know how difficult it is to dry your hair when it’s long? It’s not worth it. I mostly walk around with towel-dried hair in a bun. 

But I’ll skip the makeup. When I received my photo, my husband had no recollection of the random weekday night we ate Chinese food. 

“Did I take that photo of you? What’s up with the makeup?”

Dammit, not every experience on the internet is a winner. But I’m still opening email messages with discount codes and catchy titles. Even if you’re lamenting over a spammy in-box, you are, too.

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Today is the Carnival of HR, a glorious celebration of writers and thinkers who create fabulous HR and recruiting content. It’s an excellent list of reading, but it’s long. My advice? Bookmark this page. Come back when you catch yourself mindlessly scrolling on Facebook.

Joey Price interviewed Johnny C. Taylor, Jr., SHRM President and CEO. jumpstart-hr.com/129-are-todays-hr-leaders-living-in-la-la-land-ft-johnny-c-taylor-jr-shrm-president-and-ceo/

Legendary blogger Sabrina Baker offers three questions to ask all candidates when you’re hiring for your small business. www.acaciahrsolutions.com/interview-questions-to-ask-a-potential-employee-when-finding-recruiting-and-hiring-good-prospective-staff-employees-for-your-small-business/

Wendy Berry is back from paid family leave. Look at her boys. They melt my heart. wendyberry.com/back-from-paidfamilyleave/

My partner-in-crime Sarah Brennan recommends the top 20 HR conferences to attend in 2018. www.hrtechblog.com/top-20-hr-conferences-to-attend-in-2018/

Longtime buddy Charlie Judy implores you to reconsider the soul-crushing activity of performance management. www.workxo.com/blog/post/239-performance-management-soul-crusher

My friend and #HustleUpTheHancock supporter Brad Galin is screaming at his HR technology! www.rollercoasterhr.com/screaming-at-my-technology/

Raj Singh and I met during my trip to New Zealand. He’s fabulous and wants you to be anyone you want to be. employmentinnewzealand.blogspot.co.nz/2017/11/be-anyone-you-want.html?m=1

Here is Cheryl Nelson’s first blog post ever. Congratulate her for taking the plunge! kolormehr.wordpress.com/2018/02/14/jumping-in/

Wally Bock is famous for his #FF recommendations. In this piece, he writes about leadership’s dirty little secret. www.threestarleadership.com/leadership/leaderships-dirty-little-secret

Melissa Fairman is a compassionate leader and tells you why she meets once a week with every single person on her HR team. hrremix.com/2018/02/06/meet-week-team/

My awesome friend and elected SHRM board member Steve Browne wants you to flourish. Yes, he’s talking to you. sbrownehr.com/just-flourish/

Kate Bischoff asks and answers why you’d help employees. Really, you should help them. thrivelawconsulting.com/2018/01/29/why-help-an-employee/

Tamara Rasberry is a critical thinker and asks you to consider the everyday black history makers and moments. tamaramrasberry.com/2018/02/10/everyday-black-history-makers-moments/

Meet Mark Souter, an HR leader who needs you to say yes. Do it! medium.com/@MarkSouterLive/just-say-yes-7205a3463fc3

Yvonne LaRose is tackling tough subjects: office drama and betrayal. careercoachcorner.wordpress.com/2018/02/17/betrayal/

Mike Haberman offers ten human resources steps that will save you. omegahrsolutions.com/2018/02/ten-human-resources-steps-that-will-save-you.html

Here’s Julie Winkle Giulioni. She’s writing about challenges facing leaders and managers. www.juliewinklegiulioni.com/blog/leadership-matters/whoa-what-are-todays-most-common-leadership-mistakes/

Katrina Collier is the most fun and entertaining woman in our industry. She’s talking about women and the workplace. www.crowdcast.io/e/the-socialrecruiting-26/register?session=1

Renée Robson is a strong writer and asks you to invest in yourself. reneerobson.com/2018/02/20/investing-in-yourself/

Kelly Marinelli writes about combating sexual harassment and offers a game plan for HR. www.solvehrinc.com/the-solve-hr-blog/2018/1/10/combating-sexual-harassment-a-game-plan-for-hr

John Hollon explores what a great candidate experience means. recruitingdaily.com/organizations-great-candidate-experience-others-dont-john-hollon/

Have a look at John Baldino on employer branding and the idea of family in the workplace. humareso.com/2018/02/07/please-mr-postman/

Jennifer Juo is writing on Udemy about L&D’s role in the reskilling revolution. business.udemy.com/blog/lds-role-in-the-reskilling-revolution/

Jazmine Wilkes wants you to know that black blogs matter. hrjazzy.blog/2018/02/01/we-are-here-and-we-matter-blackblogsmatter-challenge-week1/

Heather Bussing of HR Examiner agrees with Jazmine and also believes that black blogs matter. www.hrexaminer.com/why-black-blogs-matter/

John Sumser wonders why HR is fiddling while Rome burns. www.hrexaminer.com/fiddling-while-rome-burns/

Helo Tamme has a strong post about the role of people in workplace happiness. workplace-happiness.com/2018/01/22/role-of-people-in-workplace-happiness/

The #MeToo movement has made an impact on HR. Jane Watson writes about organizational culture and harassment. talentvanguard.com/2018/02/18/its-a-sign-org-culture-harassment/

Maren Hogan of Red Branch Media wants you to follow the 15 steps to hire the right remote worker every time. redbranchmedia.com/blog/15-steps-remote-hire/

What do you know about predictive analytics? Gemma Toth is here to teach you how it applies to HR. allinhr.wordpress.com/2018/02/12/predictive-analytics-in-hr-do-you-have-the-data-needed-to-back-that-up

Ben Eubanks is writing about the hidden battle for SHRM and HRCI recertification credits. I had no idea there was a battle. upstarthr.com/the-hidden-battle-for-shrm-and-hrci-recertification-credits/

An important message from Mark Fogel: Don’t believe everything you read or watch, including HR websites. fistfuloftalent.com/2018/02/dont-believe-everything-read-watch-even-hr-websites.html

The talented Wendy Daily is trying to escape procrastination like all of us. mydaileyjourney.com/2018/01/20/escaping-procrastination/

Anne Tomkinson asks a good question. “How solid is that career ladder?” hrunderground.wordpress.com/2018/02/05/how-solid-is-that-career-ladder/

Are you sick of buzzword bingo? Katrina Kibben riffs on the trendiest buzzword: employee engagement. katrinakibben.com/2018/02/07/employee-engagement-2018/

Brent Skinner is principal analyst covering HCM at Nucleus Research. Read about the state of the HCM market here. nucleusresearch.com/research/single/state-hcm-market-2018/

Voice of HR is back. Founded by Mark Stelzner, his colleague Kimberly Carroll writes about three big changes in talent acquisition software. ia-hr.com/3-big-changes-in-talent-acquisition-software-i-hope-we-see-in-2018/

Matt Stollak wonders what HR would be like in an organized crime family because he’s creative like that! truefaithhr.blogspot.com/2018/02/what-would-hr-be-like-in-organized.html

Check out Judy Lindenberger on maximizing the benefits of executive coaching. www.lindenbergergroup.com/7-step-guide-maximizing-benefits-executive-coaching/

See why Tim Sackett is jealous of pretty people. timsackett.com/2018/01/19/the-one-big-problem-with-being-pretty/

John Hunter writes about the new age of robots and what it means for jobs. management.curiouscatblog.net/2018/01/23/the-new-age-of-robots-and-what-it-means-for-jobs/

Sharlyn Lauby outlines the ten strategies for every human resources team on the HR Bartender website. www.hrbartender.com/2018/strategy-planning/future-hr-10-strategies-human-resources/

Tony Schwartz talks to Globoforce about how to effectively manage energy, rather than time. www.globoforce.com/gfblog/2018/employees-energy-schwartz/

Claire Petrie writes about transferable job skills and finding your path. clairepetriehr.wordpress.com/2018/01/18/transferable-skills-and-finding-your-path/

Do you know what Occam’s Razor is? Paul Hebert wrote an explanation and how it applies to HR. fistfuloftalent.com/2018/02/hr-needs-shave-occams-razor.html

Antoine Ray asks you to consider going global to combat your talent shortage. www.unleashgroup.io/news/going-global-talent-shortage/

Visit Dorothy Dalton’s blog and learn about the concept of “diversity of thought” and the talent pipeline. dorothydalton.com/2018/02/13/diversity-of-thought-and-the-talent-pipeline/

Is HR on the employee’s side? Dave Ryan has some thoughts. www.performanceicreate.com/hr-theyre-not-on-the-employees-side/

Ben Martinez wants you to embrace a goal mindset. fistfuloftalent.com/2018/01/simple-not-easy-goal-mindset.html

Read Kris Dunn’s take on VPs and leaders who print things out from the internet and make decisions using irrational data points. www.hrcapitalist.com/2018/01/when-your-boss-acts-like-a-dinosaur-and-you-just-serve-up-the-brontosaurus.html

In the #MeToo era, Dawn Burke asks if white men should be called privileged. fistfuloftalent.com/2018/02/metoo-era-white-men-called-privileged-yes-thats-ok.html

Lee Price tells us why you need to build a people stack before a marketing stack. managingeditor.com/jeff-perkins-focuses-building-people-stack-marketing-stack/

The team at TalentCulture, a website founded by Meghan M. Biro, would like you to get your email under control. talentculture.com/get-email-control/

As a bystander with power, if you see or hear harassing behavior, you must respond to it. But how? Jonathan Segal has answers. blog.shrm.org/blog/bystander-interventions-without-paternalism-or-re-victimization

Jesse Lyn Stoner believes if your organizational culture is not working, look to its polarities for clues on what needs to be changed. seapointcenter.com/organizational-culture-polarities/

Mary Faulkner wants you to learn leadership lessons from Frank Oz and The Muppets: survivingleadership.blog/2018/01/21/life-and-leadership-lessons-from-frank-oz/

Dan Cross writes about ADA Education and Reform Act of 2017. It’s a bill that will make it more difficult for people with disabilities to have equal opportunity to employment, access consumer goods and services, and participate in State and Local government. medium.com/crossover-hr/an-education-and-reform-act-that-doesnt-educate-or-reform-333cbeab9970

My friend and champion Jennifer McClure is thrilled for the new year, but she would like a vacation right now. I keep inviting her places. She’s too busy for me. jennifermcclure.net/2018/01/02/welcome-new-year-now-when-can-i-take-a-vacation/

Keynote speaker Ryan Estis lays out the four ways to help your small business grow. ryanestis.com/performance/4-keys-to-grow-your-small-business-in-2018/

The amazing Carlos Escobar asks you to put some good into the world. Please? cescobar.com/2018/02/14/put-some-good-into-the-world/

Over at HR Books, I wrote about why self-help books don’t always help HR. hrbooks.com/self-help-books-HR

Finally, one of my favourites is from Doug Shaw. He thinks angels punish us by answering our prayers. Reminds me of a quote from Truman Capote. “More tears are shed over answered prayers than unanswered ones.” artsensorium.com/2018/02/13/sometimes-the-angels-punish-us-by-answering-our-prayers/

Hope you enjoyed Carnival of HR for February. Want to participate in March? Want to be a host? Check out Robin Schooling’s blog for more information. And email me with late additions, revisions, or just to say hello.

I’ve missed you, HR friends!

 

 

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all jobs suck

My email inbox is full of messages from people just like you who hate their jobs.

Earnest folks. Men and women with degrees, professional careers, student loans, and mortgages. Human beings who are frustrated with work and have nowhere left to go except the internet. They google I+Hate+Work or I+Hate+HR, find my blog, and confirmation bias kicks into high gear. They feel like they’ve found a woman who hates work as much as they do.

It’s true. I hate work.

But all jobs suck. Even the good ones. Don’t email me just to complain. And, if you do, expect a templatized response.

Hello, Sally. Thanks for reaching out. I’m sorry to hear work is so stressful. I will tell you something you don’t want to hear: All jobs suck. There are highs and lows in every field. Want to feel better about work? Worry less about your career and care more about your life outside of work. Get a few hobbies or rediscover your friends. Gain perspective on what matters to you.

I know you see people on the internet who seem to love their jobs. They are lying. Okay, maybe they’re telling the truth. But they’re happy regardless of the work. And happy is the wrong word to use. Most likely, they are resilient. Happy people fall back on relationships and extra-curricular activities when a job is stressful or unsatisfying.

Do you have a best friend? Something to distract you from a tough day at the office? A creative outlet? No? Well, here’s my advice: Take work less seriously and reprioritize your life. Make a list of three things you would do if you had a day off tomorrow. Take the day off and do one thing. Get greedy and do two things. Or be disruptive and tackle the whole list.

Can’t take the day off? American PTO policies suck! Don’t be a jerk, but work 22% less hard tomorrow. Take a longer lunch or go on an extended Starbucks break. Get balance in your life by grabbing that balance back.

You can do it. I believe in you.

Love,
Laurie

People hate this response, but, years later, they write back and thank me for my pragmatic advice. They know I’m right. Yes, HR sucks. I’m sure your boss is a dick. But all jobs suck, even the good ones, and most of us are in a prison of our creation. Time to open the door from the inside and let yourself out.

To help reach more miserable people, I bought www.alljobssuck.com and will link to this blog post. Unhappy workers who hate their jobs will wind up here with you and everybody else who wasn’t born wealthy and has a job that sucks. This post will serve as a permanent reminder that feelings are temporary and jobs don’t suck forever. It’s possible to step off the treadmill and grab control of life.

The permission slip you’ve been waiting for — to take the day off, care a little less, or quit their jobs — has arrived. And it didn’t come from HR.

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Are you a Winter Olympics fan? Did you see the opening ceremony? We’re still getting over being sick, so we watched the ceremony from the comfort of our couch.

The best part of the Winter Olympics is watching people from warm-weather countries compete in cold weather sports. There are the Nigerian bobsledders who honed their craft in Houston. The Kenyan Olympian at the entire event who is an alpine skier and crowdfunded her way to the games. And I love the Iranian cross-country skier who flies to Turkey to train. It’s inspiring to see these women push their bodies to the limit in a variety of terrains that aren’t accessible to them.

I also love the Winter Olympics because each contest, no matter how boring, represents an innate desire for perfection achieved through a rigorous commitment to practice. The Winter Olympics reminds me it’s not enough to be gifted; your natural abilities won’t calm your nerves. Talent gets you the invitation to try; training awards you the privilege to compete for gold.

The final thing I appreciate about the Winter Olympics is that I learn about sports not on my radar screen. I’m looking at you, biathlon. Hard to get excited about people skiing and shooting rifles except, now that I’ve run marathons, I’m envious of the quiet and intense focus required to push your body to the limit and hit your mark with a weapon. 

I’m not Jason Bourne, but reading the coverage of the biathlon event makes me think that I’d love to try something like it. Curling it too social for me. I want endurance sports and guns, but, you know, in a healthy way.

So consider me a fan of the Winter Olympics. I’m all in with Skeleton, Freestyle Skiing, and Nordic Combined. But I’m not buying any Ralph Lauren winter gear. Those puffy gloves are ridiculous and too big for my petite hands!

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My politics are a little less than mainstream.

I’m a pro-choice secular humanist, a vegetarian, and someone who believes in the right to protect myself and shoot a sexual predator in the face.

I vote Democratic because I like roads and schools, but it’s not like I’m all that impressed with the streets near my house or your kids who can’t do math. I’d like to pay less in taxes because most of my tax money is wasted on war and a federal food policy that kills animals and makes us sick.

But mostly I vote for Democratic candidates because I’m a first-person witness to how young girls and women are treated in my country. We don’t have equal rights despite what your drunk uncle tells you, we don’t fully control our bodies, we earn less than men, we are made to climb extraordinary hurdles if/when we ascend to positions of power, and we pay extra taxes on items like tampons and yeast infection treatments.

What’s worse is that we live in a society where we victimize women — physically, sexually, socially, emotionally — and then offer blame, shame, and maybe local resources that are supplemented by private donations and volunteer hours.

Not that you care, but I’m voting for Hillary because it’s not always great being a woman in America. And I think Donald Trump’s supporters will benefit from a Clinton presidency much like they’ve benefitted from an Obama administration while simultaneously saying racist and overtly stupid things.

So even though #imwithher, I can’t call Trump supporters “deplorables.”

Here’s why.

I firmly believe that behaviors (and not people) are deplorable. It’s an adjective to describe something that’s shockingly bad. It bugs me when smart people use “deplorables” as a collective noun.

If everything you disagree with is deplorable than nothing is deplorable. When you overuse the word, it loses its meaning. Look at the way people (like me) use the word “awesome.” If everything is awesome — getting my car washed, getting free Amazon Prime Shipping, scoring an upgrade on Delta — how do you describe the natural wonders of the world?

I’m not about calling people “deplorables” and I think you should stop saying it, too.

Sexually offensive language? Wretched. Building a wall? Stupid and short-sighted. Also, racist. Advocating sexual assault? Yes, this is deplorable.

But half of the country is supporting Trump, which means that your neighbors and colleagues are Trump voters. And if they’re deplorable today, they’ll be deplorable on November 9th after Trump loses the election. And then I don’t know how you get anything done — meetings, community programs, play dates — with people whom you don’t respect and trust.

Violent, sexist, racist language is never acceptable. Call it out on the spot, teach your children to do better, and then go vote. In fact, vote early and then go volunteer on election day to drive people to the polls.

But I think you’ll have a much better life — and better relationships with people in the short-term and long-term — if you lead by example and stop calling Trump voters “deplorables.”

It’s just unhealthy, and honestly, it stoops to Trump’s level of vague and invalid generalization without facts.

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twitter chatMy HR career is in failure mode.

It’s no surprise. The signs have been there for a while. I think it began in 2013 when I spoke at a conference with Kris Dunn and had a hotel room that overlooked a dumpster. It hasn’t picked up since.

Yes, I’ve travelled all over the world and had a ton of amazing experiences. I also just stood on three reams of paper in a co-working space and begged HR ladies to be a little more disruptive and innovative.

Good grief. What the hell has become of me?

The good news is that my little software play — which doesn’t have a website or a logo but has reached the point of MVP — will launch after Thanksgiving.

GlitchPath will help you predict and beat failure. Maybe. TBD. Fingers crossed.

And nothing says failure more than a Twitter chat, which is what I’m launching on October 17th at 1PM ET. Each week, we’ll tackle failure from a new perspective. Careers. Politics. Dating. Why Starbucks can’t have two lines — one for plain old coffee and one for speciality beverages.

I’ll post the topics & questions for the failure chats on Friday. We’ll chat on Monday.

Will this chat series fail? My software says it’s likely that people will lose interest in time, and it recommends that I do a podcast. But podcasts are a lot of work! I don’t have time for that shit.

I’ll be back, tomorrow, with the questions for Monday’s inaugural twitter chat. Hope you can join us.

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